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Friday Fictioneers- 11 July 2014/ Drought

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Friday Fictioneers- hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields-Addicted to Purple

 

PHOTO PROMPT – Copyright – Kelly Sands

 The truth is more horrifying than fiction.

Word Count- 103

Drought

The lone surviving daughter in her family Laxmi looked at the sky hopefully.

Dark clouds, lightning and thunder promised a good rain fall this year.

She hoped her parents might not have to sell her this year to repay their debts.

In the last three years many in their debt ridden village were compelled to sell their wives and daughter to survive the ravaging drought, an uninvited guest.

The meager money provided by the State and Union Govt. to the drought affected areas did not reach the small farmers and agricultural workers like them.

She sighed, ‘ it’s too early to be hopeful.’

 

 

(related link- Farmers selling wives and daughters to survive drought)

 

 

About Indira

I knew all along that life is about, love, compassion, compatibility and friendship, but now I have discovered that life is also about sharing thought, encouraging others and getting encouraged. So here I am with my blogs about life, friendship, love, and whatever life has taught me.

22 responses »

  1. I hope the rain comes. It is always the poorest who suffer the most in such times. Telling it through the experience of the girl who was afraid she would be sold makes it so much more personal and moving

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    • What is funny or cruel that these poor villagers always suffer, either from flood or drought. Thanks for the visit and comment.

      On Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 4:29 AM, Indira's Blog wrote:

      >

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  2. Nice one Indira. It’s never too late to be hopeful either.

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    • Monsoon is sometimes treacherous but yes, it’s hope that keep the fight alive in people.

      On Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 12:48 PM, Indira's Blog wrote:

      >

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  3. Very confronting story! Lets hope these clouds have a silver lining.

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  4. Sigh! It is sad that this still happens in some villages. A touching story there!

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    • This and lot more atrocities still happen with women in India, sad indeed. Thanks for the visit and comment dear.

      On Sat, Jul 12, 2014 at 9:31 AM, Indira's Blog wrote:

      >

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  5. May the rains fall soon. What a great story.

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  6. Indira, That’s a good and really realistic story. It’s just started to rain more where we are, but the reservoirs are still in sad shape. The government has started water restrictions. We hope for the best every year. Well done. —Susan

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    • Thanks Susan. We are also having some rain since last two days but not enough. There are talks of joining all rivers. Let us hope….

      On Sat, Jul 12, 2014 at 12:23 PM, Indira's Blog wrote:

      >

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  7. Dear Indira,

    It’s a hard life you’ve described in your story and far too often true. Well done.

    Aloha,

    Doug

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    • Some states really suffer too much due to drought, I just tried to show their miserable life. Thanks for your comment.

      On Sat, Jul 12, 2014 at 4:03 PM, Indira's Blog wrote:

      >

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  8. Dear Indira,

    The subject of your story is sad. I’m going to be the “bad guy” here and make some grammatical suggestions.

    She hoped her parents do not have to sell her. Since last three years; drought compelled her debt-ridden parents parents were sell one daughter every year.
    and
    Many in their village were compelled to sell their wives and daughters to survive ravaging drought which was an uncalled guest in their village every year.

    The above two paragraphs seem similar enough that it might be more effective to put them together.

    Also there’s tense confusion. “She hoped her parents didn’t have to sell her.”

    Then I would cut the next sentence.

    then I’d suggest something like:

    IN the last three years many in their debt-ridden village were compelled to sell their wives and daughters to survive the ravaging drought, an uninvited guest.

    As I said these are merely my thoughts and suggestions and I’m certainly no expert.

    Thank you for sharing this story and shedding light on a terrible situation.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

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    • I welcome you bad guy. You help me tremendously with taking time out to read carefully and with useful suggestions. I have one doubt. What to write in place of ‘ “She hoped her parents didn’t have to sell her.”
      All your suggestions seem very nice to me. Thanks a lot. Love and hugs.Shalom.
      Indira.

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      • Oops… I guess I wasn’t clear. You have “She hoped her parents do not…” it should be “didn’t” or did not. Do not is present tense. You want past.

        Always happy to help. I have great admiration for anyone who is truly bilingual. I speak some Spanish and Hebrew but not enough to be considered fluent.

        Shalom,

        Rochelle

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      • Thanks Rochelle. I have edited my post. I like titles of your posts. Can you suggest some appropriate title for this post. I struggle too much for that. If you have time. Thanks again. You are a true friend.

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      • So much better, Indira!

        I can’t think of a different title off the top of my head. And I have to confess that I have a good friend who acts as editor for me and I for him. He’s brilliant in the title department.😉

        The article that you linked might have some clues. My friend is fond of saying that a good title adds another 100 words to the story. You could call it “Payment” because that’s certainly what these women are. And I don’t consider that particularly inspired.

        I hope I haven’t totally confused you.

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      • No dear, I fully understand you. Thanks for your reply.

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  9. Indira, great short story…you managed to convey a lot of feelings in just a few lines. Well done!

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